Center

Parent Educational Network

Parent Educational Network

Throughout the year, The Churchill School and Center offers workshops for parents .  We invite parents of Churchill students and students who do not attend Churchill to participate. Previous workshops have been offered on topics such as Internet Safety, Raising Children to be Independent Learners, the Hidden Treasures of ADHD, Demystifying the Psychoeducational Evaluation, and Navigating the CSE Process. Churchill has collaborated with the Child Mind Institute, The Yellin Center and Dr. Edward Hallowell in order to present speakers who are experts in the field of child development, effective parenting and students with disabilities.
 
Please check back for upcoming workshops for the 2017-2018 school year.  You will be able to register online. Parent workshops are free of charge; however, we do encourage parents who attend workshops to consider a donation to our Reading Initiative program.

Educate Yourself

Today, there is so much available information pertaining to learning disabilities, executive functioning, ADD/ADHD, social skills, and many other topics related to students with disabilities. It can be difficult to keep up with the latest and most accurate research, so we'll try to make it easier for you by posting a different article or website link each month...those we believe have something important to say! We hope that the chosen topics will benefit parents, families and educational professionals alike. Enjoy!

November 2018

How to Talk to Children About Difficult News : excerpt from Delaney Ruston, Screenagers' Filmmaker
 
The president of the American Psychological Association (APA), Jessica Henderson Daniel, Ph.D., says in response to Pittsburgh's shootings that “Hate crimes are the most extreme expression of prejudice. Compared to other crimes, hate crimes have a more destructive impact on victims and communities because they target core aspects of our identity as human beings.”   How do you talk to your children about tragic news like this before they learn about it on social media or get a text from one of their friends? The digital age makes it key that we get in front of these conversations quickly.  

The American Psychological Association’s guide to talking to your kids about difficult news may be helpful. They encourage parents to share their feelings with their children. It is not about burdening them with one’s anxiety or sadness or other emotions. It is about naming feelings and discussing them. This approach has been shown to be highly effective in helping youth develop greater emotional intelligence.
 

October 2018

I've recently heard many conversations among parents about their teenagers' preoccupation with their digital devices. You may or may not be surprised to know that "The Pew Research Center just released the results of a survey from 743 teens and reports 'Roughly nine-in-ten teens view spending too much time online as a problem facing people their age, including 60% who say it is a major problem.' In this same survey, 52% of the respondents reported that have tried to cut back on the time they spend on their cell phones."

Screenagers Tech Talk Tuesday Blog offers some suggestions that teens have for reducing screen time along with tips for conversation starters between parents and their children about this topic.

September 2018

As the 2018-2019 school year gets underway, you may find these tips from understood.org very helpful to you and your child in order to start school strong: 


https://bts.understood.org/

June 2018

"All children experience a mixture of excitement and nervousness when summer camp approaches. For most, excitement trumps nerves, but some children develop anxiety serious enough to get in the way of what should be a fun, formative experience." This month's Educate Yourself article from the Child Mind Institute suggest some tools to help your child tame their pre-camp nerves.

 
 

May 2018

As summer approaches, you may be thinking about how to help your children maintain their academic skills while they relax and have fun for two months. Follow these links for some suggestions: 
Fun (and Educational) Summer Vacation Activities


April 2018

What do you do when your child is anxious? Do you rescue? Avoid?
 
Here are suggestions for parents to help their child "escape the cycle of anxiety."

What to do (an not do) when children are anxious
 

March 2018

In February, all Churchill parents and our students in grades 8-12 had the opportunity to view and discuss a documentary film, "Angst - Raising Awareness Around Anxiety."  The film features candid interviews with adults and children who talk about their anxieties and the impact anxiety has on their lives and relationships. Angst differentiates between typical anxiety and an anxiety disorder. Understood.org has an excellent article which includes a chart that can help you understand the difference. The article also provides suggestions for supporting your child in either situation.
 
 

February 2018

The Washington Post's recent article about 9 Ways Parents Can Empower a Child Who Has Learning Issues includes some very helpful suggestions to parents who are seeking to support their child who may have learning and attention issues. Phyllis Fagell, the author of this article, acknowledges that it is not always easy to take the long view for empowering your child, but Ella, a child referred to in the article, sums it up: "Disability stands for something you can't do," she says. "I can read and learn, just differently. When I grow up, I plan to be a rocket scientist or an astrophysicist."
 

January 2018

Start off the New Year with a resolution to manage your screen time and that of your child's in a way that promotes more tech-free time with family.

Click here!

December 2017

A "must read" for parents of daughters is Rosalind Wiseman's 3rd edition of Queen Bees & Wannabes.  The most current edition of this book provides insight and advice on early puberty, the online world of social networks, cyberbullying. Learn strategies to help your daughter survive cliques, gossip, boys and the new realities of "Girl World."
 
Here is a link to  some top tips from Queen Bees & Wannabes.
 
Join the Churchill School and Center Parent Book Club on February 7th at 9:30 AM to discuss the tools that Wiseman offers to help your daughter feel empowered and make smarter choices. 

November 2017

How to Talk to Children About Difficult News : excerpt from Delaney Ruston, Screenagers' Filmmaker
 
The president of the American Psychological Association (APA), Jessica Henderson Daniel, Ph.D., says in response to Pittsburgh's shootings that “Hate crimes are the most extreme expression of prejudice. Compared to other crimes, hate crimes have a more destructive impact on victims and communities because they target core aspects of our identity as human beings.”   How do you talk to your children about tragic news like this before they learn about it on social media or get a text from one of their friends? The digital age makes it key that we get in front of these conversations quickly.  

The American Psychological Association’s guide to talking to your kids about difficult news may be helpful. They encourage parents to share their feelings with their children. It is not about burdening them with one’s anxiety or sadness or other emotions. It is about naming feelings and discussing them. This approach has been shown to be highly effective in helping youth develop greater emotional intelligence.